New Company claims to have 'complete cure for most diseases', but is it too good to be true?

An virginia organic & natural  company that is expanding to their own herbal micro-farm, recently announced that it would be able to cure diseases like Cancer and helps control & manage diseases like Allergies through their alternative natural and organic product line,  within the year. But is this claim too good to be true?

“We believe we will offer in a year’s time a product line for complete wholeness for some of the most common disease like cancer,” NaTasha Cherry, Ceo of the The Apothecary , told the news outlet. “Our cure will be effective from day one, non- invasive and will have no or minimal side-effects at a much lower cost than other treatments on the market. Our solutions are both organic and natural.”

The Apothecary claims it has developed a herbal blend that makes use of therapeutic properties that target cells that help the body heal, a claim that has been met with skepticism in the medical community but customers say, It’s a life-changing discovery for them and has given many customers their life and health back.

Poor or inadequate diets are linked to four of the top 10 causes of death: heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes. During a nutritional intake assessment, the Healthy Eating Index for 1999-2000, researchers for the Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion noted that only 10% of the U.S. population had an adequate diet, 74% had inadequate nutrient intake, and 16% were rated to have a poor diet, markedly increasing the risk for major health problems.

To be clinically significant, a deficiency needs to be common and the adverse impact of that deficiency needs to be strong. But identifying deficiencies is challenging, as controversy exists regarding whether nutritional deficiencies should be based on “optimal intake” and, if so, what optimal intake should be. The recommended daily allowances (RDAs) the government has established do not clarify optimal nutritional intake; rather, they are calculated to estimate levels necessary to prevent a disease state in 98% of healthy people, depending on their age and gender.

Optimal nutrient intake for immune function, cardiovascular health, and osteoporosis prevention are clearly higher than the RDAs involved. This article does not hope to resolve the controversies related to optimal intake and precise dosing, but it does aim to highlight important deficiencies that can be easily corrected and would result in substantial improvements in health.

Poor or inadequate diets are linked to four of the top 10 causes of death: heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes. During a nutritional intake assessment, the Healthy Eating Index for 1999-2000, researchers for the Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion noted that only 10% of the U.S. population had an adequate diet, 74% had inadequate nutrient intake, and 16% were rated to have a poor diet, markedly increasing the risk for major health problems.

To be clinically significant, a deficiency needs to be common and the adverse impact of that deficiency needs to be strong. But identifying deficiencies is challenging, as controversy exists regarding whether nutritional deficiencies should be based on “optimal intake” and, if so, what optimal intake should be. The recommended daily allowances (RDAs) the government has established do not clarify optimal nutritional intake; rather, they are calculated to estimate levels necessary to prevent a disease state in 98% of healthy people, depending on their age and gender.

Optimal nutrient intake for immune function, cardiovascular health, and osteoporosis prevention are clearly higher than the RDAs involved. This article does not hope to resolve the controversies related to optimal intake and precise dosing, but it does aim to highlight important deficiencies that can be easily corrected and would result in substantial improvements in health.

Media Contact: 

Natasha Chery

The Apothecary

Ticherryorg@yahoo.com

804-297-8965

Richmond,Virginia

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